Tag Archives: High Line

Fall in a NY minute

IMG_7612

October, like last year, was full of garden chores and much digging. We planted 1000 bulbs and dozens of new trees and shrubs, moved a few dozen more perennials and roses, and cleaned up all the beds and mulched. In between we argued about everything from edging type to bulb planting techniques, moved a billion wheelbarrows full of dirt, and generally enjoyed the warm temperatures. When I left on the 22nd there were still a few struggling sweet peas, while the anemones were happily turning out several flowers a day. It was hardly recognizable as fall in Edmonton.

But I had no regrets leaving for NYC. October is a beautiful month there too. I hit up all my old haunts – the Conservatory Garden, High Line, NYBG and Wave Hill. Of course it rained while I was at the NYBG and was entirely too sunny by the time I got to Wave Hill, but that’s just par for the course. I also had a little nap in the sun in the Conservatory Garden before proceeding over to my friends’ place – just like old times. Sorry for the purely phone photography.

 

IMG_7621

IMG_7677

IMG_7584

IMG_7578

IMG_7575

IMG_7557

IMG_7708

IMG_7482

IMG_7505

IMG_7324

IMG_7320

IMG_7493

IMG_7468IMG_7376

IMG_7444

IMG_7425

IMG_7415

IMG_7413

IMG_7410

IMG_7234

IMG_7189

IMG_7140

IMG_7112

IMG_7094

 

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Amy, Flowers

Winter Madness

IMG_0485

Hellebores in NYC in December

I struggle in January – it always seems never ending, and I had forgotten what it is to be staring down 5 months until “spring” (which is the term I use to describe the last two weeks in May – others have been known to employ “hogslop”). After living in the East, where I usually had snowdrops in February and reliably had early bloomers by mid-March to look forward to, January in Alberta has seemed interminable. But last week the muscari I forced (in the beer fridge my brother graciously loaned me) finally started to bloom and things seemed doable.

IMGP8526

Muscari ‘Artiste’ from Botanus and one of mom’s forced hyacinths

The fridge is now filling up with little pots of seeds that need to be chilled. I’m trying a bunch of new stuff: annuals, perennials, bulbs. I’m sure I will have pretty high failure rates, but for the price, seeds offer a great return in anticipation and the opportunity to try stuff no one else has. Some seeds will be going outside into the snow in the next few weeks, while others will be warmly tended with heat mats under my new grow lights.

It reminds me of when dad decided we should grow native grasses, which have all kinds of weird requirements for germination. Unfortunately, meeting those requirements was the most exciting thing about them – they eventually were labelled weeds and removed. Sorry dad! But on the plus side you clearly imparted some lunatic impulses towards growing novel things.

IMG_0755

My NARGS seed exchange haul

I am also working on possibilities for grand adventures next winter. Every time I go to complain I consciously remind myself that this is a choice – no one has to live like this. People ask if I miss NYC, and I do, every day, but I don’t regret leaving. NYC couldn’t easily commit to my demands for a garden so we had to part terms. Now I just need to figure out where I can find that commitment. If it means a little globe wandering, well, now’s the time right? If anyone has any thoughts let me know! I am currently looking at UK gardening opportunities.

IMG_0508

Mahonia (about to burst into fragrant, yellow bloom) and Red Sprite Winterberry on the High Line in December

Links:

Buttermilk Tangelo Scones

A fascinating article on archiving the web

I made these chocolate brownies with peanut butter frosting last night – pretty great. I skipped the salt because unsophisticated.

Great furniture picks – I think current internet taste is finally infiltrating my brain. Related: the new Ikea line which is awesome!

Listening to this performance by Lake Street Drive from Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis, which is on Netflix Canada. So much talent on display – worth a watch.

Cool trailer for a pixel-inspired dance show via Kottke

Lost buildings of London

From the same blog: Christmas Meat Auction – I bet Shaun wishes there was one of these in Saskatoon

Impossible chocolate flan

1 Comment

Filed under Amy, Links

Weekly Links

Last weekend I took a quick walk over to the Conservatory Garden. The late summer plantings are stunning right now. Spilling every which way in fiery colours. In contrast to the Highline, which is swathes of drying grass broken only occasionally by flowers. There were a few interesting flowering shrubs, and the roses that bloom continuously all year. Whatever kinds they are, I want them.

In other news, I made a chocolate walnut cinnamon cake. It was solid (the smell alone was worth it) but not something I would repeat (and you ONLY get recipes I’ll repeat, multiple times, so just trust them even if I don’t post pictures, ok, KIMBERLEY?). Also we stopped by Sullivan Street Bakery and had another Jim Lahey sighting. Dude is enthusiastic, gotta give him that. Plus he makes good bread. Sam’s comment of the day: “It really smells like bread in here. It’s overwhelming actually.” Obvious, but fair. Lahey’s method results in really flavourful bread and that’s imparted in the smell too. We aren’t used to it, which is a pity.

XKCD had a great comic this week, as well as column on what would hypothetically happen if a rainstorm dropped all its water in a single drop.

West Wing campaign ad! “No Will, it’s frivolous. It’s a frivolous crisis.”

BUTTERMILK IS AWESOME

Moment of zen

Japanese flower parks = the corn maze of the future?

3 Comments

Filed under Amy, Flowers, Links

Weekly Links: Maple Blueberry and Strawberry Rhubarb Waffle Toppings

An evening walk on the High Line – still one of my favourites

Dad’s resting up for our show tonight (One Man, Two Guvnors) so I’m writing a quick blog post. I’m still experimenting with last weekend’s honey yogurt waffle recipe (they weren’t crispy enough, but I did like them with the addition of plums and cardamom). However, we tried out the maple blueberry sauce (I used fresh berries and didn’t strain it) and I also cooked down some strawberries and rhubarb for a second topping (a quart of strawberries and roughly 1 1/2 cups chopped rhubarb, with a few tablespoons of sugar, plus enough water to cover the bottom of the pot. Simmer and stir occasionally until soft and thick. Add some lemon juice and vanilla to taste before serving). Both were excellent with whipping cream or yogurt, or as stand-alone toppings.

We took Audrey to Best Pizza and had a pie topped with bacon and garlic. Still one of the best. Also went to a cooking class with Maggie – it was more about socializing, but it was cute to see everyone so excited about doing things in the kitchen. I was a bit disappointed that the meal wasn’t more seasonal. It seems like such a crime to ignore the beautiful produce bursting forth from the market at an alarming rate. Dad and I did our part and ate corn and an heirloom tomato salad for brunch this morning, with gooseberries and peaches for dessert.

Lemon verbena, gooseberries and plums from Union Square Market

A new moon for Pluto“It’s like, since being kicked out of the planet gang, it’s decided to form a rival solar system,” said Dean Burnett, a neuroscientist and stand-up comic in Britain. “Good on Pluto, I say.”

I love a good yogurt dressing on most things

We had a really good buttermilk lemon chess pie in Brooklyn a few months back

Beautiful bookshelf

Photographs of storms and icebergs by Camille Seaman

A gorgeous April wedding – I love spring flowers. Plus a pretty wedding cake.

Nigella Lawson and Anthony Bourdain are hosting a cooking show… should be… interesting?

A gorgeous shade of orange in Park Slope

Comments Off on Weekly Links: Maple Blueberry and Strawberry Rhubarb Waffle Toppings

Filed under Amy, Food, Links

The High Line


We took a stroll down the High Line today and my companion graciously allowed me to wax poetic about Piet Oudolf, who designed all the plantings. The perennials are in fine form right now, so if you haven’t gone, I recommend a visit. If you can get one of the sweet lounge chairs around 14th street you could make a real afternoon of it and laze about eating People’s Pops and sipping egg creams. Apparently there are also artisan ice cream sandwiches Friday-Sunday – doesn’t get much better.

Thursday Links

I’m obsessed with Ingrid Michaelson’s version of ‘Can’t Help Falling in Love’. You can listen/download it free here
Rustic elegance in a black and white photograph
Piet Oudolf – website and flickr stream

Comments Off on The High Line

Filed under Amy, Links